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Tea Glaze

Tea Glaze

Tea Glaze

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Tea, typically known for its comforting brew, has ventured beyond the teacup and into our favorite treats. Whether it's the malty notes of black tea or the tangy fruitiness of hibiscus, tea-infused glazes are working their way into our desserts. Creating a tea glaze is a breeze, requiring just brewed tea and powdered sugar. These glazes don't just introduce subtle and aromatic complexities; they also bring a touch of sophistication to a wide range of delights, from cakes and pastries to cookies and doughnuts.
Yields
1.0 cup
Tea Glaze

Ingredients

1 cup powdered sugar

2-3 tablespoons brewed tea, cooled (Hibiscus and Assam Jorhat Featured)

Directions

Prepare Hibiscus Tea: To make the brewed hibiscus tea, measure about 1-2 tablespoons of loose leaf hibiscus tea (adjust to your preferred strength) and place it in a heatproof container or teapot. Bring water to a boil, then pour it over the tea leaves. Let it steep for 5 minutes, or until it reaches your desired strength. Strain the tea and allow it to cool to room temperature.

Prepare the Glaze: In a mixing bowl, sift the powdered sugar to ensure a smooth glaze.

Gradually add 2-3 tablespoons of the cooled brewed hibiscus tea to the powdered sugar. Begin mixing with a whisk or fork.

Depending on your desired glaze consistency, you may need to add more tea. If it's too thick, add a little more tea, one teaspoon at a time. If it's too thin, add more powdered sugar, a tablespoon at a time, until you reach the desired thickness.

Whisk the glaze vigorously until it's smooth and free of lumps.

Once your cakes, muffins, or pastries are cooled, drizzle the hibiscus tea icing glaze over them using a spoon or piping bag. Allow the glaze to set for a few minutes before serving.

Now, you can enjoy your treats with the delightful flavor of hibiscus tea icing glaze made from loose leaf hibiscus tea!

This glaze adds a unique and slightly tart floral flavor to your baked goods, creating a delicious and visually appealing finish.

Tea Glaze

Tea Glaze

COOK TIME:

1 cup powdered sugar

2-3 tablespoons brewed tea, cooled (Hibiscus and Assam Jorhat Featured)

Prepare Hibiscus Tea: To make the brewed hibiscus tea, measure about 1-2 tablespoons of loose leaf hibiscus tea (adjust to your preferred strength) and place it in a heatproof container or teapot. Bring water to a boil, then pour it over the tea leaves. Let it steep for 5 minutes, or until it reaches your desired strength. Strain the tea and allow it to cool to room temperature.

Prepare the Glaze: In a mixing bowl, sift the powdered sugar to ensure a smooth glaze.

Gradually add 2-3 tablespoons of the cooled brewed hibiscus tea to the powdered sugar. Begin mixing with a whisk or fork.

Depending on your desired glaze consistency, you may need to add more tea. If it's too thick, add a little more tea, one teaspoon at a time. If it's too thin, add more powdered sugar, a tablespoon at a time, until you reach the desired thickness.

Whisk the glaze vigorously until it's smooth and free of lumps.

Once your cakes, muffins, or pastries are cooled, drizzle the hibiscus tea icing glaze over them using a spoon or piping bag. Allow the glaze to set for a few minutes before serving.

Now, you can enjoy your treats with the delightful flavor of hibiscus tea icing glaze made from loose leaf hibiscus tea!

This glaze adds a unique and slightly tart floral flavor to your baked goods, creating a delicious and visually appealing finish.

Tea Glaze

Tea, typically known for its comforting brew, has ventured beyond the teacup and into our favorite treats. Whether it's the malty notes of black tea or the tangy fruitiness of hibiscus, tea-infused glazes are working their way into our desserts. Creating a tea glaze is a breeze, requiring just brewed tea and powdered sugar. These glazes don't just introduce subtle and aromatic complexities; they also bring a touch of sophistication to a wide range of delights, from cakes and pastries to cookies and doughnuts.

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