My Tía's Buñuelos

My Tía's Buñuelos

My Tía's Buñuelos

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This family recipe has been a favorite since childhood. My aunt effortlessly prepared them, while my job was to generously sprinkle the fried, flaky, thin, and crispy disks with cinnamon sugar. There are various styles of buñuelos, but this version is the most commonly found in Chihuahua, where my family resides. If I were to share a tip, it would be not to skip the step of letting the bunuelos dry out for two hours. I've often wondered why some buñuelos felt heavy and oily, and my aunt revealed that this was the secret to her ultra-bubbly and flaky buñuelos. Feel free to have fun with the cinnamon sugar mix. I’m a purist and kept it simple with our Cinnamon Toast Spice which features three different types of cinnamon and a touch of nutmeg.
Yields
20.0 servings
Prep Time Total Time
40 min 40 min
What You'll Need

Mixing bowls, Rolling pin, Cast iron or Large frying pan, Tongs, Large plate, Linen or cloth for resting the dough, Damp towel, Wooden rolling pin

My Tía's Buñuelos

Ingredients

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon flake sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1/4 cup lard
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water
  • 4 cups vegetable oil

Sugar Dusting:

Directions

  1. Mix all the dry ingredients together and then add the lard and hot water. Knead the mixture until it combines.
  2. Portion the dough into 20 small balls. Flatten these balls into 4-inch disks, then cover them with a damp towel and let them rest for 10 minutes.
  3. After the disks have rested, use a wooden rolling pin to roll the buñuelo until they become round and paper-thin. You can gently lift the rolled dough with your knuckles and pull to create thin buñuelo.
  4. Once rolled and shaped, place the raw disks on a linen and let them rest and air-dry for 2 hours or overnight. This will allow the buñuelo to stiffen and not absorb as much oil when frying.
  5. On a large plate, mix the granulated sugar and Cinnamon Toast Spice until evenly combined.
  6. Once the buñuelo have rested, in a cast iron or a large frying pan, add the vegetable oil. Wait until the oil is hot, and then fry the buñuelo until they are golden brown. Use tongs to flip the buñuelo for even cooking.
  7. While hot, gently sprinkle and toss the buñuelo in the cinnamon sugar mixture.
My Tía's Buñuelos

My Tía's Buñuelos

COOK TIME:
  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon flake sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1/4 cup lard
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water
  • 4 cups vegetable oil

Sugar Dusting:

  1. Mix all the dry ingredients together and then add the lard and hot water. Knead the mixture until it combines.
  2. Portion the dough into 20 small balls. Flatten these balls into 4-inch disks, then cover them with a damp towel and let them rest for 10 minutes.
  3. After the disks have rested, use a wooden rolling pin to roll the buñuelo until they become round and paper-thin. You can gently lift the rolled dough with your knuckles and pull to create thin buñuelo.
  4. Once rolled and shaped, place the raw disks on a linen and let them rest and air-dry for 2 hours or overnight. This will allow the buñuelo to stiffen and not absorb as much oil when frying.
  5. On a large plate, mix the granulated sugar and Cinnamon Toast Spice until evenly combined.
  6. Once the buñuelo have rested, in a cast iron or a large frying pan, add the vegetable oil. Wait until the oil is hot, and then fry the buñuelo until they are golden brown. Use tongs to flip the buñuelo for even cooking.
  7. While hot, gently sprinkle and toss the buñuelo in the cinnamon sugar mixture.

My Tía's Buñuelos

This family recipe has been a favorite since childhood. My aunt effortlessly prepared them, while my job was to generously sprinkle the fried, flaky, thin, and crispy disks with cinnamon sugar. There are various styles of buñuelos, but this version is the most commonly found in Chihuahua, where my family resides. If I were to share a tip, it would be not to skip the step of letting the bunuelos dry out for two hours. I've often wondered why some buñuelos felt heavy and oily, and my aunt revealed that this was the secret to her ultra-bubbly and flaky buñuelos. Feel free to have fun with the cinnamon sugar mix. I’m a purist and kept it simple with our Cinnamon Toast Spice which features three different types of cinnamon and a touch of nutmeg.
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